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Chris Stewart

Chris’ experience with youth, family life and death, and his ability to connect with audiences of all ages has made him a sought out speaker for years.

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Tony Brandt

Being raised in a large adoptive family and helping many people in need over his life, Tony's inspiring stories will captivate and challenge any audience.

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Casting Nets Institute

Join us for Transform Your World Evangelization Training Camp
July 12-17, 2015

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Pro-life is Cool

By Chris Stefanick

In many ways, coolness wasn’t a big help to adolescent development in the ‘80s and ‘90s. As a member of “generation Jeff Spicoli” (see “Fast Times at Ridgemont High”—or better yet, don’t see it!), drinking, messing around with girls, and skating by in school with a C- would have all been socially acceptable for me.

The ever-shifting parameters of “cool” drove hordes of teens to put grease in their hair in the ‘50s, sleep outdoors for three days in the mud at Woodstock in the ‘60s, wear bellbottoms in the ‘70s, and popularized disturbingly neon clothing in the ‘80s.  Much like the wind, “cool” is hard to pin down, but its effects on youth culture are hard to miss.

Thanks to an early conversion to the Catholic faith, I wasn’t a casualty of cool. In high school I wore baggy pants, had long hair and had a rosary dangling visibly from my pocket. I could rip on electric guitar and knew every John Michael Talbot (a Catholic quasi-monk musician) song ever written. I wasn’t the norm. The fact that I was deeply religious and regarded as cool by my peers was an anomaly. And as a teenager I stood out like a sore thumb at pro-life demonstrations.

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